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ISTP NEWSLETTER Vol 7, No. 1 March, 1997

http://pwg.gsfc.nasa.gov/istp/newsletter.html

istp-logo-new

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The ISTP "Observatory" tracks a Sun-Earth Connections Event.

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IN THIS ISSUE

Title Author

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Editor:

Michael Cassidy
CASSIDY@ISTP1.GSFC.NASA.GOV

Contributing Editors:

Steven Curtis - Science Editor
U5SAC@LEPVAX.GSFC.NASA.GOV

Doug Newlon - Data Distribution Facility
NEWLON@IPDGW1.NASCOM.NASA.GOV

Kevin Mangum - Central Data Handling Facility
MANGUM@ISTP1.GSFC.NASA.GOV

Dr. Mauricio Peredo - Science Planning and Operations Facility
PEREDO@ISTP1.GSFC.NASA.GOV

Dick Schneider - ISTP Project Office
SCHNEIDER@ISTP1.GSFC.NASA.GOV

Jim Willett - NASA Headquarters
WILLETT@USRA.EDU

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Key Parameter Cumulative Index search on the Web

William H. Mish

In 'Data Products' off of the ISTP Home Page
http://pwg.gsfc.nasa.gov" there is provided a new capability to search the cumulative index of the most recent Key Parameter CD-ROMs (non image and image CDs). Thus one can enter time span, a particular mission (e.g., WI), data type (K0 is the default), descriptor (e.g., SWE), version number and the search will return the files and CD-ROM numbers meeting the search criteria. Use of this tool is well documented on the Page itself and use is straight forward. For direct access, the URL for this page is: http://pwg.gsfc.nasa.gov/istp/science/kpi"


William H. Mish
ISTP Deputy Project Scientist for Data Systems
Code 690.0
Goddard Space Flight Center
Greenbelt, Md. 20771

Email to William Mish
wmish@istp1.gsfc.nasa.gov

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Key Parameter Cumulative Index search on the Web

POLAR ORBIT, ATTITUDE, AND RELATED ISSUES

William H. Mish

(An update to the Article that appeared in Vol 5, No. 2, Nov. 1995 ISTP Newsletter) This article discusses additions to the orbit, spacecraft and despun platform attitude, and modifications to the Central Data Handling Facility ICSS routines to include EDMLT, Magnetic Latitude and "L" Shell (using 1995 IGRF model) and availability of the Tsyganenko T89C model with field line tracing to 100 Km and what models are used for the Auroral Oval by the ISTP/GGS Science Planning and Operations Facility.

Introduction

Resident on the CDHF and on both the Level Zero and Key Parameter CD-ROMs are orbit, spacecraft attitude, despun platform attitude and spacecraft body spin phase (Level Zero CDs only) daily files which provide the spacecraft orbital position and attitude of the spacecraft body and despun platform at one minute resolution, as well as the spin phase of the spacecraft body. Orbit and spacecraft attitude are in GCI, GSE and GSM. These files are all encapsulated as Common Data Format (CDF) files.

I) Addition of EDMLT, Magnetic Latitude and "L" Shell:

It was apparent that the auroral physics being studied by the Polar spacecraft instruments would benefit by having available, as a function of the spacecraft position, the Magnetic Local Time (EDMLT), (which is magnetic longitude in units of hours), Magnetic Latitude (in units of degrees) and the associated "L" Shell parameter (in units of Re). These parameters are computed using the eccentric dipole (ED) and 1995 IGRF 1995 magnetic field model coefficients (with secular variations included).

The above discussed parameters are now included in the Polar Orbit CDFs at the standard one minute time resolution of the orbital position and are available to the Key Parameter Generation Software in the CDHF via a call to ICSS_COMPUTE_EDMLT. The bottom 3 panels of Figure 1 show these parameters plotted for a portion of December 17, 1996 from the Polar Definitive CDF.

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Figure 1
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II) Inclusion of a reference orbit number in the Polar Orbit CDF:

The Polar Orbit CDFs now contain a reference orbit number defined as follows:

An orbit is defined to start from the ascending node (when the Polar spacecraft orbit crosses the Earth's equator). The first fractional orbit before reaching the ascending node is numbered zero and the subsequent orbits numbers increase monotonically . See Data Format Control Document, Revision 2, May 1996 p. 3-135 for instructions on how to access the orbit number from the Orbit CDF.

III) Additions to the despun platform attitude CDF

At the Polar Despun Platform Meeting - 8/1/95 the PI teams with instruments of the despun platform requested that additional information be included in the despun platform CDF. (Note that the presently provided GCI, GSE and GSM pitch, roll and yaw are to be retained). Requested were: a) The despun platform attitude in GCI, GSE and GSM (this is the same coordinate system provided for the attitude of the spacecraft body); b) The despun platform offset angle from Nadir; c) A despun platform in-lock flag and DPA indicator; and d) during slewing, the dynamic position of the platform as a function of time.

The top 3 panels in Figure 1 display the DSP offset angle, DPA indicator (see description below) and DSP lock status (see description below) as a function of time for December 17, 1996. Figure 1 is a blow up of hours 17.5 - 22.5 which shows the presence of the dynamic position of the platform as it slews to various positions. Note that the lock status is 0 during these slews indicating an out-of-lock condition. TABLE I below summarizes what these files contain.

                         TABLE I
ORBIT CDF                S/C ATTITUDE CDF        DSP ATTITUDE CDF
-----------------------------------------------------------------
S/C POSITION             S/C BODY(RA&DEC)      PITCH/ROLL/YAW
    GCI                      GCI                   GCI
    GSE                      GSE                   GSE
    GSM                  GSM                    GSM
    EDMLT                BODY SPIN RATE         DPA ACCURACY      
                         GCI_RA/DEC_ERROR         INDICATOR
    INV LAT                (CDF Global data)    ATTITUDE DSP IN
                                                 S/C FRAME OF REF 
                                                DSP IN-LOCK FLAG  
    L SHELL                                     NADIR OFFSET ANG
    HELIOCENTRIC

S/C VELOCITY
    GCI
    GSE
    GSM
    HELIOCENTRIC
HELIOGRAPHIC POSITION OF EARTH
HELIOGRAPHIC POSITION OF THE S/C
GREENWICH HOUR ANGLE
GCI SUN POSITION
CARRINGTON ROTATION #
ORBIT #
 (CDF global data
 with pointers to the
 records where ascending
 mode crossings occur)
ORBITAL POSITION
  PRECISION METRIC
  (CDF global data)

IV) Discussion of the Orbit Precision Metric:

The orbit precision metric (Note: located in the Global data of the CDF) has been developed by constructing a difference vector between time-coincident ephemeris positions (e.g., time overlapping ephemeris positions computed from separate tracking data) to be compared by measuring the components of this difference vector in a coordinate system fixed at the position of the spacecraft in the first ephemeris. Calling the coordinate system Sx, Sy, Sz, the Sx-axis is coincident with the geocenter radius vector to the spacecraft and is measured positive in the direction of the Earth's center. The Sy-axis is perpendicular to Sx in the plane and direction of the satellite motion. The Sz-axis is perpendicular to the plane of the motion and completes the right- handed system.

The "Radial", "along track", and "cross track" items are the Sx, Sy, and Sz components, respectively, of the difference vector. The "delta-r" and "delta-v" items are the magnitude of the difference vector for the position and velocity, respectively. Finally, the RMS is the standard deviation of the component differences over the length of the compared ephemeris. Thus the smaller this "error ellipsoid" is, the better the agreement between tracking observations.

V) DSP Accuracy Indicator

This Indicator specifies whether the despun platform attitude is statistically good (=0) or bad (=1). The attitude is derived from a batch of computed attitudes at a fixed offset angle. Thus data are accumulated until either all the required data are collected or the offset angle is changed to a new value. A statistically good attitude from a batch is one in which no more than 1/9 of the original points were deleted during the least-squares fit process.

VI) The Tsyganenko model

The Tsyganenko model (T89C) (Tsyganenko, N.A.:1989,"A Magnetospheric Magnetic Field Model with a Warped Tail Current Sheet", Planetary Space Sci.37,5) using a Kp= 3-,3,3+, is now available to the Key Parameter Software via an ICSS call (ICSS_TSY) in the CDHF. And this model can be used to trace magnetic field lines down to 100 Km altitude. This is the same model that is used by the ISTP/GGS Science Planning and Operations Facility in support of science planning.

VII) Auroral Oval Models

The Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF) employs various models of regions of geospace as part of its planning and analysis functions. One key tool used by the SPOF is the Satellite Situation Center (SSC) software which contains an integrated set of models for various regions comprising the Solar-Terrestrial system. These models were presented at several ISTP Science Working Group meetings, and are summarized on the Web at URL:

In order to carry out its DSP Pointing plan generation functions, the SPOF uses an auroral oval model that differs from that used in the SSC. The rationale for using a different model is that DSP pointing strategies dictate that the SPOF maximize the likelihood of imaging the entire auroral oval, or selected regions of the oval. To this end, the Holzworth and Meng model (GRL Sept. 75, vol 2 no. 9 pg. 377) was selected because it includes variations in oval size and location with magnetic activity. The SPOF products for DSP pointing thus include an auroral oval computed in corrected geomagnetic coordinates (using IGRF 1995) where the equatorward edge of the oval is computed for high geomagnetic activity (Q-index of 6), while the poleward edge is computed for low activity (Q- index of 0). This choice of activity levels implies that the instantaneous auroral oval will likely fall within the oval used for planning purposes.


William H. Mish
ISTP Deputy Project Scientist for Data Systems
NASA
Goddard Space Flight Center
Mailstop 694.0
Greenbelt, MD 20771

wmish@istp1.gsfc.nasa.gov


Mauricio Peredo
ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility
Goddard Space Flight Center
Mailstop 632.0
Greenbelt, MD 20771
peredo@istp1.gsfc.nasa.gov

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The ISTP Sun-Earth Connection Event of Jan 6-11, 1997: First ever tracking of a solar event from "cradle to grave "

Mauricio Peredo, Nicola Fox and Barbara Thompson

For the first time ever, the satellites of the International Solar -Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) "Observatory" have tracked a solar eruption all the way, from a Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) expelled from the Sun, through interplanetary space, until it hit the Earth's magnetic environment, causing there violent disturbances and spectacular auroral displays. The initial expulsion occurred on the Sun on January 6, 1997, and a resulting magnetic cloud hit the Earth on January 10 (see Figure 1).

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Figure 1, Image contains Approx 99K bytes
The ISTP "Observatory" tracks a Sun-Earth Connections Event.

The Sun often erupts. It flings out white-hot ionized gas (actually hotter than white-hot, to where it glows in X-rays) with explosive violence. Only occasionally is this gas aimed at Earth, however, and it is even more unusual for scientists to be watching the potentially disruptive mass ejection (as they were in this case) just as it leaves the Sun. This made it possible to alert other scientific teams of possible activity they might observe two to three days later, that being the time normally required for such ejecta to traverse the 93-million mile void from Sun to Earth. Thus, while this was not the first , or the largest, event of this nature to be detected, the ISTP "Observatory" includes a complement of spacecraft and ground-based missions that allow study of this "space storm" on a scale never accomplished before.

Initial evidence of the event was reported during an ISTP Science Workshop at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center on January 7-9, 1997. Scientists from the joint NASA-European Space Agency satellite Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) showed evidence that a CME, directed towards Earth, had been emitted from the Sun (see Figure 2).

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Figure 2
Image contains Approx 264K bytes
Observation of the Coronal Mass Ejection leaving the Sun from the SOHO/LASCO instrument.

Based on previous observations of such events, they predicted it would arrive at Earth on January 10. SOHO and NASA's WIND spacecraft in interplanetary space ( Figure 3) between the Sun and the Earth confirmed the passage of a magnetic cloud 30 million miles thick and taking about 24 hours to pass through on its journey through interplanetary space.

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Figure 3
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WIND provides remote-sensing of the radio signals from the event, and later on SOHO and WIND in-situ observations reveal a magnetic cloud is headed towards Earth.

As the cloud engulfed Earth, it's magnetic field and a trailing burst of plasma 30 times denser than the normal solar wind generated a "One-Two Punch" that compressed the front of the magnetosphere (the magnetic bubble that shields Earth from the energetic particles spewed from the Sun) inside geosynchronous orbit (Figure 4) at 6.6 Earth radii (normally it lies about 10 Earth radii away), and resulted in intense geomagnetic activity (Figure 5). Preliminary estimates suggest that at the height of the event the electrical power dissipated in the aurora (both northern and southern hemispheres) was about 1400 Gigawatts, almost double the electrical power generating capacity of the United States (approximately 700 Gigawatts).

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Figure 4
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Schematic illustration of the location of geosynchronous satellites during the event.

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Figure 5
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Auroral activity resulting from magnetospheric compression.

The ISTP science teams are thus trying to assemble the anatomy of this event, as it evolved from start to finish. This includes its three-dimensional structure and evolution as it influenced the magnetosphere. A theoretical effort is also underway to help fill in observational gaps (Figure 6).

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Figure 6
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A snapshot from the computer simulation of the event showing the (log) density pattern and volume dominated by the earth's magnetic field.

Fortunately, the data covers the event fairly thoroughly and can readily be used to gauge the ability of theoretical or numerical models to "predict" the effect of events like this one. The results will be available to agencies which are interested in directing technical investigations regarding possible reported effects on communications systems and geosynchronous spacecraft.

An event home page has been setup on the world wide web to disseminate information on the event and to provide access to the available data. The event page is accessible at:


Barbara J Thompson
ARC
Goddard Space Flight Center
Mailstop 682.0
Greenbelt, MD 20771

thompson@eitv3.nascom.nasa.gov


Nicola J Fox
NRC
Goddard Space Flight Center
Mailstop 696.0
Greenbelt, MD 20771
fox@lepmfs.gsfc.nasa.gov


Mauricio Peredo
ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility
Goddard Space Flight Center
Mailstop 632.0
Greenbelt, MD 20771
peredo@istp1.gsfc.nasa.gov

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Annoucement of ISTP Science Workshop on the Jan 6-11, 1997 (and similar) magnetic cloud events.

Mauricio Peredo

From: Mauricio Peredo, ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility
To: Members of the Space Science Community
Re: Goddard Workshop on the ISTP Sun-Earth Connections Event of Jan 6-11, 1997

Dear Colleagues:

As you all probably know, the CME-Magnetic Cloud Event of January 6-11, 1997 has attracted a large amount of attention both in the scientific community and the media. As a result, a number of analyses are underway on various aspects of this event. In order to promote correlative studies in the spirit of ISTP, and maximize the scientific return of these investigations, the ISTP project is planning a workshop to foster joint analyses of this and similar events.

We plan to hold the workshop at Goddard Space Flight Center on April 8-9, 1997. The key objective of the workshop is to focus ongoing analyses towards papers to be presented at the special event session at the Spring 97 AGU, and later on for the proposed special issue of GRL.

The current plan calls for a "hands-on" workshop with online access to event data. A detailed plan will depend on the anticipated number of participants. All members of the international solar, interplanetary, magnetospheric and ionospheric physics communities are invited to attend. Therefore we request that you let us know by March 21 if you plan to attend (please indicate your nationality if you are not a U.S. citizen so we may arrange for access badges with the security office). Please address responses to one of the event coordinators at the e-mail addresses listed below.

Background information on the event, and access to a large volume of existing event data is available from the event web site at URL:

http://pwg.gsfc.nasa.gov/istp/cloud_jan97/event.html"

It must be noted that this event is also an important period for the InterAgency Consultative Group (IACG) since it occurred during the designated time interval for the IACG Campaigns 1 and 3. In addition, there will be an "ESLAB" Symposium titled: "Correlated Phenomena at the Sun, in the Heliosphere and in Geospace". This symposuium has been organized by ESA endorsed by the IACG and will be held at ESTEC, Noordwijk, on 22-25 September 1997. The symposium will provide an important forum for discussing the IACG Campaign results coming from the CME-Magnetic Cloud event. Special sessions or presentations on the event are also planned during the GEM, CEDAR and IAGA meetings later this year.


Nicola J Fox
NRC
Goddard Space Flight Center
Mailstop 696.0
Greenbelt, MD 20771
fox@lepmfs.gsfc.nasa.gov


James L Green
NASA
Goddard Space Flight Center
Mailstop 630.0
Greenbelt, MD 20771
green@nssdca.nasa.gov


Mauricio Peredo
ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility
Goddard Space Flight Center
Mailstop 632.0
Greenbelt, MD 20771
peredo@istp1.gsfc.nasa.gov


Barbara J Thompson
ARC
Goddard Space Flight Center
Mailstop 682.0
Greenbelt, MD 20771
thompson@eitv3.nascom.nasa.gov

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The IACG Selects New Initiatives for Space Coordination
James L. Green

The 16th Inter-Agency Consultative Group (IACG) meeting was held from December 10-11, 1996, at Cape Canaveral, Florida. The IACG is made up of the science heads from ESA (Dr. R. Bonnet), IKI (Dr. A. Galeev), ISAS (Dr. Nishida), and NASA (Dr. W. Huntress). The role of the IACG is to facilitate the coordination between the bot IACG space physics missions, to acquire the data necessary to meet new science objectives, and to promote correlative data analysis to get more quality science out of each individual agency's missions.

In order to focus their correlative data analysis efforts, each of the agency's core missions are participating in well defined scientific campaigns. Four campaigns have so far been defined. The IACG has utilized three working groups in order to plan and conduct the science campaigns. Working Group-1 is the Science Working Group (chaired by A. Pedersen, ESTEC) and is chartered with the planning of coordinated science campaigns concentrating primarily on the Geotail, Interball, Wind, Polar, and SOHO missions (referred to as the IACG core missions). Working Group-2 (chaired by J. Green, NASA GSFC) has facilitated data exchange between the agency missions and scientists. Working Group-3 (chaired by K. Uesugi, ISAS) has performed the necessary satellite orbit or orbital analysis for each of the science campaigns. For more information about the efforts of these working groups and the resulting campaigns please see the URL:

http://iacg.gsfc.nasa.gov

OR

http://iacg.org

Update on the Campaigns

A key part of this IACG meeting was to provide the agency heads with an update on the status of the campaigns. The First IACG Campaign is designed to study the Earth's magnetotail energy flow and the role of non-linear dynamics. The lead coordinator for Campaign 1 is Dr. J. Green. Dr. Green gave an update on Campaign 1 which has been very successful, benefiting from spacecraft (Wind, Geotail, Interball and Polar in particular) in interesting locations throughout the magnetosphere. In addition to the IACG web site, data from selected intervals have been put on CD ROM and are available from the ISTP Project and at the National Space Science Data Center. Dr. Green also announced that Phase 2 of Campaign 1 was well underway and that the important science interval chosen extended from October 1, 1996 through the end of February 1997.

The Second IACG Campaign deals with boundaries in collisionless plasmas and is co-chaired by Dr. R. Schmidt. Dr. Schmidt gave an overview of the Cluster situation as Cluster was a major element of Campaign 2. Because the Cluster mission was aborted after launched no correlative data activities are planned at this time. At the time of the IACG meeting, a decision on a full reflight of Cluster was pending from the ESA Science Programme Committee. At this time (early March, 1997), no decision has been made to fly the entire mission; however, the remaining Cluster single space spacecraft, called Phoenix, will be launched at the end of 1997 or early 1998.

The Third IACG Campaign covers solar events and their manifestations in interplanetary space and in geospace. Campaign 3 has the ambitious aim of identifying a CME on the Sun and observing its effect in geospace. A coronal mass ejection and magnetic cloud (CME- MC) occurred on January 6-11, 1997 and has attracted a large amount of attention both in the scientific community and the media. This CME- MC event is an important period for the Inter-Agency Consultative Group (IACG) since it occurred during the designated time interval for the IACG Campaigns 1 and 3. In addition, there will be an ESLAB Symposium titled: "Correlated Phenomena at the Sun, in the Heliosphere and in Geospace". This symposium has been organized by ESA endorsed by the IACG and will be held at ESTEC, Noordwijk, on September 22-25, 1997. The symposium will provide an important forum for discussing the IACG Campaign results coming from the CME-MC event.

Reshaping Future Space Science Coordination

The IACG created a new working group structure to carry out its current and future space science coordination activities. The re- structured working groups and panels are:

New WG-1: Solar System Exploration Working Group
New WG-2: Solar Terrestrial-Heliospheric Working Group
New WG-3: Data Archiving Working Group
Panel 1 : High Energy Astrophysics Panel
Panel 2 : Infrared/submm astronomy Panel

Whether to continue the VLBI Panel will be decided after it reports to the IACG at the next meeting. IKI will host the next IACG meeting later in 1997. The new WG-1 activities will be defined by a team (with one member from each agency) which will report at the next IACG meeting. Future solar and planetary missions are to be included in the new WG-1. The new Solar Terrestrial-Heliospheric Working Group will have much the same membership as from the previous Working Groups-1, -2 and -3, replacing the structure that the IACG created ten years ago. This new WG-2 will ensure that the present IACG space science campaigns will be brought to a successful completion and that campaign results will be preserved in data bases available to a wide science community and published in peer reviewed journals such as the Journal of Geophysical Research. Dr. A. Pedersen will be the head of WG-2 for the next year.

One of the goals of the IACG is to make the Space Science Campaign data sets available to the entire scientific community for future research. To be successful in this goal, the new archiving effort will require support from all the agencies. The IACG, therefore, created a new Data Archiving Working Group (WG-3) to cover all the space science disciplines. The membership of this WG and its charter are currently being defined. The heads of the new WG-1 and WG-3 have not been named at this time.

The Future of Space Physics Correlative Science

It was clear from this meeting that the interagency solar- terrestrial physics programs have produced a powerful fleet of missions that are returning a wealth of new observations of our solar-terrestrial environment. This international collaborative effort has been carried out during solar minimum. The next solar maximum will start approximately at the end of the decade, well within the expected lifetimes of most of the current solar-terrestrial mission fleet. Thus, this fleet can provide a unique and powerful tool for studying the solar-terrestrial system during the rise to solar maximum and at solar maximum. This provides an unprecedented opportunity for studying solar variability and its effects on the heliosphere and geospace environment. The former Working Groups-1 and -2 recommended to the IACG that the agencies keep the solar-terrestrial missions in operation through solar maximum. The IACG agreed with this recommendation.

Next Meeting

The IKI will host the next IACG meeting in Russia later in 1997.


James L Green
NASA
Goddard Space Flight Center
Mailstop 630.0
Greenbelt, MD 20771
green@nssdca.gsfc.nasa.gov"

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The Satellite Situation Center is Now Fully "On the Web"

Robert McGuire, Greg Galiardi, Tamara Kovalick, Rich Baldwin, Carrie Gallap and Mauricio Peredo

Although available as a beta version for some time to those who have known or those who have looked, the Satellite Situation Center (SSC) software and database are now fully converted to a Web interface (hence SSCWeb) and rehosted on a much faster server. Try the (new) URL:

http://sscweb.gsfc.nasa.gov

The SSC system includes a database of >40 missions maintained with the latest definitive and predictive ephemerides and supports key facility operations of the NSSDC's Satellite Situation Center and the ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF) with the same database and software available to all users.

SSCWeb supports output of spacecraft locations in many different coordinate systems and with various field parameters and geophysical regions as desired. The software can also list various kinds of conjunctions including region co-occupancy and radial or magnetic alignments of spacecraft or spacecraft with ground stations. The interface operates in two modes (standard and advanced) to support both new or occasional users along with users needing to tap more complex capabilities of the codes. The Web interface features an innovative use of "hidden fields" to allow users to save and restore query specifications on their local machines without the need for the server to track their individual "sessions." Look for WWW conversion and expanded capabilities of the older SSC's X/PEX-based graphics shortly, to supplement the powerful listing and logical query capabilities of this system.

The SSC and SSCWeb are a joint effort of the NASA GSFC Space Physics Data Facility (software definition, design and development, plus overall management), the National Space Science Data Center (the SSC operations staff) and the ISTP SPOF (shared science leadership of the effort and the physical server).


Carrie Gallap
Raytheon STX
Goddard Space Flight Center
Mailstop 632.0
Greenbelt, MD 20771
gallap@rumba.gsfc.nasa.gov


Rich Baldwin
Raytheon STX
Goddard Space Flight Center
Mailstop 632.0
Greenbelt, MD 20771
baldwin@nssdca.gsfc.nasa.gov


Tamara Kovalick
Raytheon STX
Goddard Space Flight Center
Mailstop 633.0
Greenbelt, MD 20771
kovalick@cdi.gsfc.nasa.gov


Greg Galiardi
NASA
Goddard Space Flight Center
Mailstop 632.0
Greenbelt, MD 20771
galiardi@nssdca.gsfc.nasa.gov


Robert McGuire
NASA
Goddard Space Flight Center
Mailstop 632.0
Greenbelt, MD 20771
rmcguire@pop600.gsfc.nasa.gov


Mauricio Peredo
ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility
Goddard Space Flight Center
Mailstop 632.0
Greenbelt, MD 20771
peredo@istp1.gsfc.nasa.gov

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DATA FILE UPDATE TOOLS MATRIX
Gerald Blackwell

The following table list three tools that will be used by operations to make up dates to the orbit and POLAR despun platform attitude data files. The table provides descriptions for each update, the associated missions and the effective update time interval.


Gerald Blackwell
CSC
Mailstop 510.0
Goddard Space Flight Center
Greenbelt, MD 20771
gblackwell@istp1.gsfc.nasa.gov

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Newsletter HTML Author: Michael Cassidy - RMS Technologies, Inc.
cassidy@istp1.gsfc.nasa.gov

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